Site icon Barb Sotiropoulos

5 Red Flags for Instagram DM Scams

It happens to almost every artist who has an account on Instagram – you get a direct message asking if you take commissions. While the request in and of itself seems like it should be a compliment and not something you should worry about, there’s good reason to take extreme caution when getting these types of Instagram DM requests.

It’s an exciting prospect as an amateur artist when you start getting commission requests from people other than your friends and family. If this is something you like doing and want to make part of your business, then having an outsider contact you might make you feel like you have more credibility as an artist. Unfortunately, when it comes to social media, these requests are often a scam.

I won’t get into all of the ins and outs of taking commissions in this post because that is a much more dense topic than we have time for here. I am however going to discuss with you some best practices you should have set up if you are planning to take commission work. This will help you have a place to direct people who are legitimately interested in your work and weed out the ones who are not.

Red Flags

There are many red flags when it comes to whether a request of this type is legit or not. Here are a few common ones to look out for when you receive a message request of this type.

RED FLAG 1: They open their message with no formal greeting or bad grammar.

Text message culture has made a lot of us lazy when it comes to messaging and using full sentences. That’s understandable when you’re talking to someone who you know well or family, but super inappropriate when you are messaging someone you don’t know for the first time. Simply opening with “do you do commissions” (sometimes with or without the question mark) is a great way for me to ignore someone’s message entirely. That said sometimes they do attempt to at least say hello in the initial message but with no additional context as to why they are messaging you.

First of all, it doesn’t take much to say hello to someone. Artists are not a McDonald’s drive-thru where you can just roll up in our DMs and ask for a McPainting with cheese. I bet even at a fast food restaurant you probably at least would say hi to the person taking your order, right?

Secondly, If the artist has a link in their bio to their website, or they had looked at your previous posts at all they would see whether or not you have done commission work before. You could argue that they are just looking for an immediate answer or are lazy, but also no one needs commissioned art immediately. It typically isn’t a last-minute request sort of thing based on the time it takes to create it alone, so if someone is really interested in your work they can take the time to do some research on you.

RED FLAG 2: They don’t follow you, or haven’t liked any of your posts

This isn’t always the case for it to be a scam but often time it is. People are getting their Instagram accounts hacked at an alarming rate each day. It’s possible one of your legitimate followers has had this happen to them and someone is now posing as them using their account.

Typically speaking though you will get a scam request from someone who either has a private account, has very few followers or posts of their own. They also usually don’t follow you at all. Sure, we all have that relative who has Instagram but never posts. That might even be your parents and you’re thinking – “wait, but they’re not sketchy!” That may be true, but if the person has never contacted you before and the other red flag boxes are checked, there is reason to be at minimum suspicious.

Related: 5 Ways to Stay Safe Online

RED FLAG 3: They haven’t gone to look at your website prices or quoted you an amount they are willing to pay

There’s a common scam going around right now where someone will send you an Instagram DM, sometimes even with a nice greeting, and tell you they need a gift for a child’s birthday and they just absolutely love your work and are willing to pay a certain amount for a commissioned piece from you. They may even leave a message on one of your posts asking you to check your DMs. This is the short version of a popular email scam with a similar premise.

This happened to me the other day. The guy said he went to my website and fell in love with my work. He then said to me he was willing to pay me $300 for a commission for his son’s birthday. My first thought was, if he had been to my website, he would clearly have seen the separate tab I have in my menu for commission work information. In that tab, I have links to what my starting prices are. I also very clearly state the process that someone needs to go through to request a commission from me.

Often what will happen next is they will say they couldn’t see the prices or they may not acknowledge you at all if you say the price is too low. They may also ask where you are from, which again if you’re open about you’re location they likely could have found out easily.

If you don’t already have a website set up for your artwork and are planning on taking commissions this is something you should do. It not only gives you a professional presence but allows you to have a more curated sample of your work for potential clients. It’s possible to set up very simple and low-cost websites if you’re on a budget. If you’re planning on seriously making this part of your business it’s an investment that is worth making.

Related: HOW I USE HONEYBOOK TO STREAMLINE MY CREATIVE BUSINESS

It also gives you a place you can direct potential clients who are serious about commissioning work from you to get all of the information on how to contact you. If you aren’t comfortable posting prices for your work you can give them a way to contact you for a detailed quote.

RED FLAG 4: They can only pay with a digital cheque or some other sketchy form of payment

So if you’ve actually gone far enough down the line with one of these requests, at some point the topic of payment will come up. If it’s a scam that’s the real end game here isn’t it? They will likely offer to pay you in some form of payment like a digital cheque or something that is even as ridiculous as from a child’s savings account. There is then an “accidental” overpayment made at which point they would like you to reimburse them. The catch here is that they wrote you a bad cheque, to begin with so you are in fact sending them money and they actually sent you nothing.

I can’t state this enough but 1000% absolutely DO NOT accept payments from people in anything other than legitimate transfers through sites like PayPal, Stripe, or equivalent. If you don’t have a PayPal or similar account set up for your business to accept secure payments you should.

Here is a link to more information on how you can spot, avoid and report fake check scams: https://consumer.ftc.gov/articles/how-spot-avoid-report-fake-check-scams

RED FLAG 5: They ghost, block you or get abusive when you question them

Most of these jerks will high-tail it out of there once they feel like you are on to them. If they’re extra persistent they may try to even make you feel bad for questioning them like they are doing YOU a favor or perhaps guilt you if they’re still trying to roll with the “gift for my child” bit.

Life as an artist can be tough financially, BUT you are under NO OBLIGATION to take every commission project that comes your way. In fact, I would argue if you’re trying to portfolio build you are better off doing gifts or low-cost projects for friends and family over taking on bad or potentially sketchy clients for the sake of having a “real” client. These criminals are likely going after artists because they clearly feel like we are apparently easy targets. Desperation for money will put you in a position where your guard will be down and you are more likely to fall for these kinds of scams.

HOW TO RESPOND TO INSTAGRAM DM REQUESTS

There are a number of ways you can respond to these types of Instagram DM requests when you get them. The first thing is to check out the person’s account and do some assessments. Don’t click on any links they send you in their post on Instagram, you should be able to click on the profile picture at the top to check them out. If something doesn’t seem right you could ignore, block or delete the message.

If they seem like they might be legitimate, but maybe don’t have great messaging etiquette, you have to decide whether you want to proceed or not. If you do want to proceed, you can ask a few probing questions to find out what they are looking for and the timeline. If that part of the conversation goes well you can invite them to view your prices on your website or email you a formal request. It’s important to move the conversation off of Instagram or Facebook and into email messaging where you can have a digital paper trail in a format you own.

If they get pushy about keeping it on Instagram or saying they only want to pay a certain amount, be firm with what your policies are. DO NOT let people haggle you lower or allow you to compromise your business process because they can’t be bothered to follow it. This is either a scammer or frankly may just be a difficult client to deal with going forward. You ARE NOT OBLIGATED to take on every project, so it’s ok to politely decline.

If you don’t want to take on the project, don’t think they are a scammer but don’t want to close the door to the future opportunity there are other things you can say. One option is to say all of your spots are filled right now. You could also offer to place them on a waiting list if you are curious to see how serious they are. Most artists’ lists aren’t public so they would have no way of knowing when their turn would be. You can decide in the meantime if you want to work with them and reengage later on.

Final Thoughts

People are getting desperate and thieves are getting more clever with the ways in which they are trying to scam others out of their hard-earned money. While social media apps like Instagram have become a great place to connect to a wider audience with your artwork it has also become a hotbed for scams.

The bottom line is to go with your gut. If something feels weird or off it probably is. Take some time to research the person messaging you before you respond. Scammers are counting on you giving someone the benefit of the doubt or not using critical assessments.

If you’ve gone through everything on this post and still aren’t sure. Do a quick Google search on the subject of people asking for commission requests. You’ll often get a list of other artists’ posts telling stories that will sound suspiciously similar to the message you received.

Decide what your commission policies are and stay firm to them when it comes to how you want to receive payments and the process that a potential client has to go through to commission work from you. Remember that YOU are in the driver’s seat. Having clear and structured processes in your commission business will not only come off as professional but may also be the thing that helps you avoid being scammed.

Did you find this blog post helpful? Pin it!

Exit mobile version